Tips for Pet Owners

Keep your pets healthy and safe during the holidays

Holidays bring families and friends together, but they can also mean potential hazards for pets. Table food, ornaments, and other holiday items can be harmful and sometimes fatal to cats and dogs. Every year veterinarians at the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital see an increase in a variety of digestive maladies during the holiday season.
 
Potential holiday hazards:
 
Chocolate
The holidays are a great time to cook with and enjoy chocolate; however, chocolate is very toxic to pets and can cause gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and neurological symptoms, including vomiting, rapid heart rate, high blood pressure, being over excited, and seizures. If you think your dog may have ingested chocolate, signs to watch for include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, agitation, increased thirst, an elevated heart rate and in severe cases, seizures
 
Cords and Batteries
Many decorations involve electrical cords. Check to make sure that your pets are not chewing on them, as electric shock may have devastating consequences. Also, some pets may try to eat batteries, so please make sure that they are put away safely.
 
Wraps, Foil, Ribbons, Small Parts
Candy wrappers, aluminum foil, plastic wrap, or ribbons can lead to serious problems if eaten by dogs or cats. Tinsel is particularly enticing to cats. Please be mindful about your cats chewing on and swallowing tinsel. When ingested in sufficient quantities, it binds into a rope that can cause severe intestinal obstruction and require surgical treatment. Further, any small decoration or toy poses a swallowing hazard. If a child can choke on small toys or toy parts, then so can the family dog or cat.
 
Table Food, Ornamental Plants
Table food can cause dogs to suffer from acute gastroenteritis (an inflammation of the stomach and intestines) or pancreatitis. In both diseases, dogs experience severe vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and listlessness. Bones may lead to obstructions in the esophagus, the stomach, or the intestine and lead to severe digestive signs. Furthermore, grapes, raisins, and onions are foods that dogs and cats should not eat. They are toxic to pets and can cause potentially fatal diseases, such as acute kidney failure, anemia, or seizures. Most ornamental plants, for example, poinsettias, mistletoe, and holly, can cause stomach upset.
 
Cold Weather
The weather in December and January can be quite chilly even in Louisiana. So, please bring your pets inside overnight when temperatures dip toward freezing temperatures.
 
What To Do
If your pet becomes sick or if you think that it may have ingested something harmful, contact your veterinarian immediately. Delays in seeking veterinary help may seriously complicate the problem. If your pet requires medical care after-hours, you can bring your pet to the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital on Skip Bertman Drive. The hospital is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and remains open even during holidays. Please call 225-578-9600 or go to www.lsu.edu/vetmed for more information about the Veterinary Teaching Hospital.
 

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Protect pets and horses against extreme cold

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine asks pet owners to protect their pets against the extreme cold.

Help keep your pet safe during the colder months by doing the following:

  • Don't leave pets outdoors when the temperature drops.
  • Outdoor pets use more energy to keep warm so they will need more food when it’s cold. Routinely check your pet's water dish to make certain the water is fresh and unfrozen.
  • If your dog stays outside, provide a doghouse with a raised floor that is large enough to allow the dog to sit and lie down comfortably, but small enough to hold in body heat. Cover the floor with a blanket (but only if the dog will not eat it) or maybe straw or wood shavings if available and make sure the door is turned to face away from the wind.
  • If you're feeding homeless cats, be sure to provide an insulated shelter for them.
  • Warm engines in parked cars attract cats and small wildlife that may crawl up under the hood. To avoid injuring any hidden animals, bang on your car's hood to scare them away before starting your engine.
  • Antifreeze has a sweet taste that can attract animals, but it is toxic to them. Wipe up spills and store antifreeze and other household chemicals out of reach.

Pets exposed to temperatures in the low teens or single digits for prolonged periods can get frostbite on their feet or the tips of their ears (the skin will turn darker in color). Another symptom to be watchful for is lethargy or weakness. If you feel that your pet has been adversely affected by the cold and requires medical care, please contact your veterinarian.

Horses are great at staying warm since they have many metabolic processes that generate heat or allow them to conserve heat. Their digestive processes generate a lot of heat and their haircoat can “puff-up” (this is known as piloerection) to further insulate them. Horses are actually better at staying warm in winter than staying cool in summer. 

Precautions that can be taken to protect horses from harsh winter weather:

  • Ensure that the horses have water, hay and shelter 24/7 (if they prefer to remain outside, provide them with an option to have some sort of protection from wind and rain);
  • Allow them to move around (this generates heat); and
  • If they are very old, very young, sick, too skinny, etc. and unable to thermoregulate, then they may need to be stalled and/or blanketed, along with all of the other precautions listed above.

The most important precaution is to provide an unfrozen, clean water source on a constant basis; otherwise, the horse could colic.

If your pet or animal requires medical care after-hours, you can contact the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital on Skip Bertman Drive; the hospital is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and remains open even during disasters such as hurricanes. The number for the Small Animal Clinic (pets and exotic animals) is 225-578-9600, and the number for the Large Animal Clinic (horses and farm animals) is 225-578-9500.

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Valentine’s Day hazards for pets

Valentine’s Day is an annual holiday, celebrated on February 14 with the purpose of celebrating love. Because we love our four-legged family members, it is important to remember that certain Valentine’s Day hazards should be kept away from pets, including chocolate, xylitol, alcohol, flowers, and certain gifts.

Chocolate is very toxic to pets and can cause gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and neurologic disease including vomiting, rapid heart rate, high blood pressure, overexcitation, and seizures. Because the required treatment for chocolate consumption can be expensive, you should limit the risk of exposure in the home environment, as well as keeping candy wrappers out of reach for pets.

Xylitol is a sweetener often found in sugar-free candies, gum, breath mints and children’s medications that is toxic for pets, especially dogs. If ingested, it may cause vomiting, loss of coordination and seizures.

Opening a bottle of champagne is common among people celebrating Valentine’s Day, but alcohol consumption for pets can cause vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing and more.

Caution should be used when choosing and displaying flowers for your loved ones. Lilies should be kept away from cats. If ingested, varietals such as Tiger Lilies and Easter Lilies may cause feline acute kidney failure in other cats. Other types of lilies, including Peace Lilies and Calla Lilies, cause gastric and oral irritation, and vomiting if ingested. Even roses are hazardous. The thorns may cause an upset stomach and difficultly defecating.

Care should be taken with wrapped gifts, especially small items that are easy to swallow. Bows, ribbons and other adornments can be enticing to pets, as well as dangerous if ingested.

If your pet becomes sick or if you think that it may have ingested something harmful, contact your veterinarian immediately. Delays in seeking veterinary help may seriously complicate the problem. If your pet requires medical care after-hours, you can bring your pet to the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital on Skip Bertman Drive; the hospital is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and remains open even during holidays. Please call 225-578-9600 for more information.

Other good resources are the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control or the Pet Poison Helpline. Help is available through these websites and their respective phone numbers 24 hours a day. The Pet Poison Helpline is available 24 hours, seven days a week for pet owners and veterinary professionals that require assistance treating a potentially poisoned pet. The Pet Poison Helpline’s fee of $39 per incident includes follow-up consultation for the duration of the poison case. The ASPCA for animal poison-related emergencies, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, 888-426-4435. A $65 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

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Mardi Gras Pet Hazards

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine wants to remind owners that Mardi Gras is not always Pardi Gras for pets. Mardi Gras season is a traditional and special time of year for Louisianans, filled with parades, parties, southern food, King Cake and more, but it is important for pet owners to be mindful about their pet’s physical and emotional wellbeing during this special holiday.

Veterinarians at the LSU SVM do not recommend pets ingest human food of any kind, including King Cake, gumbo, jambalaya, fried foods or other typical Mardi Gras cuisine. These types of food can upset the animal’s stomach and potentially cause GI issues. Celebrating the weekend with alcoholic beverages is extremely common, but alcohol consumption for pets can cause vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing and more.

Everyone deserves to have a wonderful and safe Mardi Gras weekend, especially pets, even if that means leaving them at home. Dogs should not be brought to parades, unless it is a parade specifically for pets. Mardi Gras parades are often loud and crowded, which can make animals very uncomfortable. When scared or nervous, animals can become easily agitated and can potentially bite. People at the parades may also not be comfortable around dogs or other pets. If you do decide to bring your pet to a parade, please make sure your pet is safety secured by a non-retractable leash, has availability to water and bring bathroom baggies should your pet relieve itself on a public sidewalk. 

Owners should also be mindful about Mardi Gras beads, other throws not designed for pets, as well as King Cake babies. Mardi Gras costumes should be evaluated for safety. The pet should have optimal breathing room and should not wear decorated necklaces as they can be choking hazards.

If your pet becomes sick or if you think that it may have ingested something harmful, contact your veterinarian immediately. Delays in seeking veterinary help may seriously complicate the problem. If your pet requires medical care after-hours, you can bring your pet to the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital on Skip Bertman Drive; the hospital is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and remains open even during holidays. Please call 225-578-9600 or go to www.lsu.edu/vetmed for more information about the Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

Other good resources are the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control or the Pet Poison Helpline. Help is available through these websites and their respective phone numbers 24 hours a day. The Pet Poison Helpline is available 24 hours, seven days a week for pet owners and veterinary professionals that require assistance treating a potentially poisoned pet. The Pet Poison Helpline’s fee of $39 per incident includes follow-up consultation for the duration of the poison case. The ASPCA for animal poison-related emergencies, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, 888-426-4435. A $65 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

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Halloween tricks and treats can be hazardous to pets

It is important for pet owners to be aware of Halloween hazards that are dangerous for animals

Halloween season has arrived, and it is expected that many people plan to have a spooky good time with family and friends, but do not forget about the safety of your four-legged friends. Halloween can be fun for you, but a number of tricks and treats can be hazardous to your pets.

Treats

Chocolate is popular with people, but your dog is attracted to it as well. Chocolate is toxic to dogs, and the darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is. If you think your dog may have ingested chocolate, signs to watch for include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, agitation, increased thirst, an elevated heart rate and in severe cases, seizures. 

Raisins can be just as toxic to dogs as chocolate and can cause kidney failure if even small amounts are ingested. Signs of raisin or grape poisoning include vomiting, nausea, decreased appetite, lethargy, abdominal pain, excessive or decreased thirst and urination, bad breath and rapid onset kidney failure.

If your dog ingests large amounts of any candy, it can be harmful and lead to pancreatitis, which is potentially fatal. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas and is very painful. Pet owners should be aware that clinical signs of pancreatitis may not present for several days after ingestion. Signs include a decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, abdominal pain and potentially, kidney or organ damage.

Tricks

Other Halloween hazards include candy wrappers and small toys. These can cause bowel obstruction that may require surgery. Watch for vomiting, decreased appetite, not defecating, straining to defecate, or lethargy. X-rays or even ultrasound may be necessary to diagnose this problem.

You may want your pet to join in the fun and dress up for Halloween. If so, please make sure that the costume does not impair your pet’s vision, hearing, movement or air intake and that it does not have small pieces that could be broken off and ingested. Before dying or coloring your pet’s fur, please consult your veterinarian, as some products can be harmful to pets even if they will not harm people. 

If your pet becomes sick or if you think that it may have ingested something harmful, contact your veterinarian immediately. Delays in seeking veterinary help may seriously complicate the problem. If your pet requires medical care after-hours, you can bring your pet to the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital on Skip Bertman Drive; the hospital is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and remains open even during holidays and weekends. Please call 225-578-9600 or go to www.lsu.edu/vetmed/veterinary_hospital for more information about the Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

You can also contact the Pet Poison Helpline, an animal poison control center based out of Minneapolis, at 800-213-6680. The helpline is available 24 hours, seven days a week for pet owners and veterinary professionals that require assistance treating a potentially poisoned pet. The Pet Poison Helpline’s fee of $39 per incident includes follow-up consultation for the duration of the poison case.

You can also contact the ASPCA for animal poison-related emergencies, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, 888-426-4435. A $65 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

Please help make this a safe and happy holiday season for all of the members of your family.

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Keep Pets and Livestock Safe From Sago Palms and Other Toxic Plants and Pesticides

Sago palm is a common plant of the cycad family that is very popular with landscapers and homeowners in the Baton Rouge area. Unfortunately, many people are unaware that sago palm seeds, leaves, and roots are extremely toxic to pets. Clinicians at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine regularly see dogs suffering from sago palm toxicity. Soon after eating seeds, leaves or roots, dogs start to throw up. Clinical signs then go on to include lethargy, lack of appetite, diarrhea and jaundice. 

Ingestion of this plant can be fatal due to its toxic effects on the liver, including disruption in blood clotting leading to bleeding. LSU veterinarians see most cases in the spring and summer; however, intoxications can occur year round. In most cases, intensive treatment is necessary, including intravenous fluids and transfusion of blood products. In spite of these efforts, more than one half of dogs die from the toxicity. This is why in the case of sago palms an ounce of prevention is really worth a pound of cure.

Many pesticides and lawn care products are potentially toxic to pets. Be sure to store these items where pets have no access to them. After treating lawns and outside areas, restrict pets from these areas until exposure danger has passed.

Also, be aware that many other types of summer foliage (such as hydrangea, wisteria, delphinium, foxglove, privet hedge and monkshood) can be toxic to pets as well, so do your best to prevent your pets from eating them.     

Plants that are toxic to horses and livestock include senna (commonly known as sicklepod, coffee senna, coffee weed and cassia) and perilla mint (also known as purple mint). Symptoms of senna ingestion include diarrhea, wobbliness, weakness and dark urine. Ruminants are primarily affected by ingesting perilla mint, and symptoms include respiratory distress.

If your pet or animal becomes sick or if you think that it may have ingested something harmful, contact your veterinarian immediately. Delays in seeking veterinary help may seriously complicate the problem. If your pet requires medical care after-hours, you can bring your pet to the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital on Skip Bertman Drive; the hospital is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. For pets (dogs, cats and exotics), please call 225-578-9600; for horses and livestock, please call 225-578-9500. Go to www.lsu.edu/vetmed for more information about the Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

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Summer Means Soaring Temperatures and Potential Life-Threatening Heatstroke for Pets

Now that summer is here, it’s good to remember that pets require special care to avoid heatstroke. Dogs cannot tell us when they feel hot, and it is our responsibility to ensure that our pets have sufficient shelter from the sun, an adequate supply of water to drink, and a way to cool off as the heat rises. Be aware of these essential needs when leaving your pets outside during the day. Moreover, do not forget that at this time of the year, it is life-threatening to leave pets in hot cars, even if they are parked in the shade, and even for just a few minutes! Each summer, the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital sees several heatstroke cases.

A dog’s body temperature is normally between 101°F and 102°F. Dogs do not sweat like people; they regulate their body temperature by panting; panting expels the heat. If the heat is not expelled fast enough, the body temperature rises. A rise of three degrees to a temperature of 105°F can cause the dog to have problems keeping up with his body’s demand for oxygen. When the temperature hits 108°F, the internal organs such as the brain can start breaking down at a cellular level.

Puppies and kittens as well as older dogs and cats are predisposed. Also, brachycephalic breeds (those with short snouts or muzzles such as pugs and bulldogs) are at increased risk.

Early signs of heatstroke are rapid breathing, rapid heart rate, and gums that change from their healthy light pink color to bright red or even dull, grayish-pink. Vomiting and diarrhea can also be observed. Heat stroke is an absolute emergency! If your dog exhibits these signs, move him to a shaded area, soak the coat in cool water, and get him to a veterinarian immediately. These signs can be followed in minutes or days by collapse, seizure, coma, clotting disorders, and death. All pets with heatstroke need to be treated immediately and monitored carefully for a few days.

If your pet requires emergency medical care after-hours, you can bring your pet to the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital on Skip Bertman Drive; the hospital is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year for emergency cases. For pets and small exotics, call 225-578-9600, and for horses and farm animals, call 225-578-9500. 

The most important aid in heatstroke is prevention, so please ensure that your outdoor pets have plenty of shade and water and never leave your pets in a parked car, even with the windows down. Make sure that your pet has a tip-proof bowl, so that he can’t spill his water bowl while you’re not at home. Lastly, do not go jogging or biking with your dog at midday during the summer. Even if you enjoy a jog or bike ride in the heat, it could have disastrous consequences for your dog. Plan walks for the early morning or late evening hours when the temperature is relatively low. With a few minor precautions, you and your pets can have a safe and happy summer.

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Hurricane Preparation Tips for Pet Owners

Pet Owners: If an emergency, disaster or bad weather forces you and your pets from your home, Will you know what to do and what to bring? 

If you are forced to evacuate your home because of a hurricane or other emergency, don’t forget to make preparations for your pets. Pets, just like any other member of your family, have their own special needs. Here are some tips from the Louisiana State Animal Response Team (LSART) and the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine to help you prepare for an evacuation.

What to Do

  • Don’t leave your pet at home! While most evacuations last only a few days, there are times that you may not be able to return quickly. The safest place for your pet is with you.
  • If you are going to a hotel, call ahead and make sure, in advance, that animals are welcome. Many hotels relax their policies during times of crisis, but don’t assume that this will be the case. For on-line information about pet-friendly hotels, check out www.petswelcome.com.
  • If you are staying with friends or family, make sure that your pets are invited as well. If not, ask for recommendations of nearby veterinary hospitals or boarding kennels and make reservations in advance.
  • Be sure that your pets are up-to-date on all vaccinations and bring proof of vaccinations with you. It is a good idea to ask your veterinarian now for a copy of your pet’s vaccination record. Keep this with your emergency kit.
  • If your pet is on medication, bring at least a two week supply.
  • Identification of your pet is crucial! The ideal form of identification is a microchip* or a tattoo. At minimum, your pet should have a tag with his name, your name, and your phone number on it. Pictures of your pet that capture identifying features are also a good idea.

*A microchip is a tiny permanent identification tag, placed under your pet’s skin by your veterinarian. By registering your name and address with the microchip company, your pet can be scanned and instantly identified at any animal facility.

What to Bring

  • Enough pet food for one week
  • Food bowl
  • Water bowl
  • Bottled water
  • Leash
  • Harness or collar
  • Proof of vaccinations
  • Rabies tag
  • Portable kennel
  • Litter box and litter for cats
  • Trash bags for stool disposal
  • Newspaper or towels for crate lining
  • Heartworm preventative
  • Flea and tick protection
  • All medications
  • For exotic pets, bring their entire habitat, including heat lamps and extension cords

Your pet’s kennel should be large enough for him to stand and turn around. Collapsible wire crates are best if your pets might be in a non-air conditioned environment for an extended period. A battery-operated fan that can attach to the cage can be a much appreciated addition.  Molded plastic airline-approved crates make for easier transport and are best for animals that don’t travel well in the car. 

People with special needs or people without transportation who have pets contact their parish emergency managers (e.g. the parish Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness) well ahead of time so that they can be registered for requiring special assistance in a disaster situation. You may need to contact the parish emergency manager via the parish sheriff’s office.

Parish Offices of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

If your pet requires emergency medical care after-hours, you can bring your pet to the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital on Skip Bertman Drive; the hospital is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year for emergency cases. For pets and small exotics, call 225-578-9600, and for horses and farm animals call 225-578-9500. The LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital typically stays open during hurricanes, but please call first to be sure that the hospital is accessible and we are able to accept patients following a disaster.

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Tips for Horse Owners to Prepare for Hurricane Season    

With the hurricane season upon us, it is important for horse owners to ready themselves in advance for evacuation and other recommended tasks related to hurricane preparedness. Here are some tips from the Louisiana State Animal Response Team (LSART) and the Equine Health Studies Program at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine for effectively preparing horse owners in areas prone to hurricane damage: 

  • Have a personal plan for your family including your animals and review and update the plan yearly. Saving the Whole Family is a useful guide from the American Veterinary Medical Association.
  • Be sure your horse is current regarding vaccinations for tetanus and the encephalitis viruses (Rabies, Eastern, Western, and West Nile).
  • Network a "plan" with the horse or farm animal-owning neighbors in your parish (get to know your neighbors, plan a meeting, talk through different scenarios, and identify the local resources for dealing with disaster situations) and be prepared to help one another.
  • Know your parish emergency managers. They are in charge during a disaster: Parish Office of Emergency Preparedness/Management.
  • Be sure that your horse has two forms of identification: (1) Permanent identification such as a microchip, tattoo or brand, and (2) Luggage-type tag secured to the tail and halter (be sure to use a leather halter for break-away purposes). Fetlock tags are useful and can be acquired on-line or from a local farm supply store or you can use a paint stick or non-toxic spray paint. Be sure to place your name, address, and phone number (phone number of someone out of state is best in the event of phone outages) legibly on the tags.
  • Be sure to store the record for the microchip number (i.e., E.I.A. or Coggins form) in an accessible location (it is recommended to keep a second copy of this information with a family member or friend in a distant location but where it will be easily accessible).
  • If you plan to evacuate (and you should ALWAYS do this if possible) in the event of a storm, have a destination and route(s) mapped out well in advance. It is important to evacuate your horses a sufficient distance from the coast and a good general guideline is north of Interstate 10, preferably north of Alexandria. January to May would be good months to prepare this plan. Arrange to leave a minimum of 72 hours before the arrival of the storm. The worst thing that can happen is to be stuck in traffic with a trailer full of horses and a hurricane approaching. Provide your neighbors with your evacuation contact information.
  • Prepare a waterproof emergency animal care kit with all the items you normally use, including medications, salves or ointments, vetwrap, bandages, tape, etc. Place the kit in a safe place where you can easily access it after a storm.
  • Start early to clean up your property and remove all debris that may be tossed around by storm and hurricane force winds. Be careful of down power lines that can be "live" and represent a danger to people and animals.
  • If you plan to weather the storm at home (this is not usually recommended), there are some general guidelines to follow:
  • The choice of keeping your horse in a barn or an open field is up to you. Use common sense, taking into consideration barn structure, trees, power lines, condition of surrounding properties and the likelihood of the property and structure to flood. Farms subject to storm surge or flash flooding should turn their horses out so horses are not trapped and thus drown.
  • Remove all items from the barn aisle and walls, and store them in a safe place.
  • Have at least a two to three week supply of hay (wrapped in plastic or waterproof tarp) and feed (stored in plastic water-tight containers, securing the container seams with duct tape).
  • Place these supplies in the highest (out of reach of flood waters) and driest area possible.
  • Fill clean plastic garbage cans with water, secure the tops, and place them in the barn for use after the storm.
  • Have an emergency barn kit containing a chain saw and fuel, hammer(s), saw, nails, screws and fencing materials. Place this kit in a secure area before the storm hits so that it is easily accessible after the storm.
  • Be sure to have an ample supply of flashlights and batteries and other non-perishable items.
  • Listen to local radio stations in your area. If Internet access is available, access state-run websites that contain accurate status information (i.e., State Police, State University, Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry) and take all cautions/warning serious and act accordingly.
  • Visit the Louisiana State Animal Response Team website for more detailed information regarding horse hurricane preparations and other emergency and health-related information. 

If your pet requires emergency medical care after-hours, you can bring your pet to the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital on Skip Bertman Drive; the hospital is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year for emergency cases. For pets and small exotics, call 225-578-9600, and for horses and farm animals call 225-578-9500. The LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital typically stays open during hurricanes, but please call first to be sure that the hospital is accessible and we are able to accept patients following a disaster.

 

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