About the Breaux Symposium

The annual John Breaux Symposium pushes the boundaries of debate around an aspect of media, politics and public policy. The Symposium aims to harness the expertise and perspectives of individuals hailing from a variety of fields and backgrounds.

Past Symposia have hosted scholars, journalists, corporate executives, and political and civic leaders. Through keynote speakers, panels and presentations, the intent of the Symposium is to discuss the public’s knowledge about some aspect of our democracy and identify possible actions to increase public awareness and constructive debate.

Learn about past Symposia

 

Images from the 2017 John Breaux Symposium

Blurred Boundaries, Real Consequences:

The Intersection of Public Policy and Race 

Mayor-President Broome visited with the Symposium presenters and guests during the reception following her keynote speech on the patio of the Journalism Building.Baton Rouge Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome greets members of the Breaux Symposium audience in the Holliday Forum while waiting to take the stage.Mayor-President Broome listens as she is introduced prior to giving her Symposium keynote speech. Mayor-President Broome discusses her ongoing efforts towards addressing inequalities in resources and opportunity in the Baton Rouge area during her Symposium keynote speech.

Mayor-President Broome takes the stage to discuss her ongoing efforts towards addressing inequalities in resources and opportunity in the Baton Rouge area. Mayor-President Broome discusses her ongoing efforts towards addressing inequalities in resources and opportunity in the Baton Rouge area during her Symposium keynote speech.Ed Pratt, press secretary for the LA Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, moderates the Media Access Roundtable that highlighted the spring Symposium's second day. The panel brought media representatives and local community organizers together to discuss the representation of race in the media. From left to right: Panelists Maxine Crump, President and CEO of Dialogue on Race; Juan Cruz, Public Health Planner and Equity Advocate; AV Mitchell, a local artist, speaker, and community activist; Myra Richardson, a youth organizer and high school student; and Shamaka Shumake, a community activist and organizer, gather at BREC's Milton Womack Park to examine how media cover various communities and discuss the best ways to connect community members to the news media.

From left to right: Panelists Juan Cruz, Public Health Planner and Equity Advocate; AV Mitchell, a local artist, speaker, and community activist; and Myra Richardson, a youth organizer and high school student, examine how media cover various communities and discuss the best ways to connect community members to the news media.From left to right: Panelists AV Mitchell, a local artist, speaker, and community activist, Myra Richardson, a youth organizer and high school student; and Shamaka Shumake examine how media cover various communities and discuss the best ways to connect community members to the news media.From left to right: Panelists Maxine Crump, President and CEO of Dialogue on Race; Juan Cruz, Public Health Planner and Equity Advocate; and AV Mitchell, a local artist, speaker, and community activist,  examine how media cover various communities and discuss the best ways to connect community members to the news media.From left to right: Panelists Kiran Chawla, WAFB lead investigative reporter; Fred Kalmbach, Managing Editor of The Advocate; Tim Morris, Times-Picayune opinions columnist; Stephanie Riegel, Greater Baton Rouge Business Report editor; and Cheryl Stroy, president of the Baton Rouge Area Association of Black Journalists, represent the media as the Media Access Roundtable examines how media cover various communities and discuss the best ways to connect community members to the news media.

From left to right: Panelists Kiran Chawla, WAFB lead investigative reporter and Fred Kalmbach, Managing Editor of The Advocate, represent the media as the panel examines how media cover various communities and discuss the best ways to connect community members to the news media.Panel organizer Dr. Josh Grimm introduces the panel of experts gathered to discuss the ramifications of a number of public policy issues on race. From left to right: Panelists Dr. Shaun Gabbidon, an expert of criminal justice; Dr. Kenneth Fasching-Varner, an expert on education; moderator Dr. Mary Campbell; and panelist Dr. Jackelyn Hwang, an expert on segregation, gathered from around the country to participate in the Race and Public Policy Panel.From left to right: Panelists Dr. Holly Wilkins, a health expert, and Dr. Ismail White, an expert on politics, react to something said during the Race and Public Policy Panel.

From left to right: Panelists Dr. Lori Latrice Martin, an expert on wealth; Dr. Srividya Ramasubramanian, a media expert, and Dr. Holly Wilkins, an expert on health, discuss their fields of expertise in relation to the issues of race and public policy.From left to right: Panelists Dr. Shaun Gabbidon, Dr. Kenneth Fasching-Varner, and Dr. Mary Campbell discuss share their thoughts on the intersection between their areas of public policy expertise and race.Dr. Srividya Ramasubramanian applies her expertise on media to the panel's topic of race and public policy. Dr. Shaun L. Gabbidon uses his expertise in criminal justice to analyze the role of the ramifications the current criminal justice system has upon minorities.

From left to right: Drs. Mary Campbell and Jackelyn Hwang share a word during the race and public policy panel.Following the tumultuous summer of 2016, professors in the Manship School examined race relations across Louisiana, which included a statewide survey. Panelists presented findings from these research projects.From left to right: Manship faculty Dr. Shaniece Bickham, Dr. Nathan Kalmoe, and Dr. Martin Johnson discuss the findings of the community resilience study they conducted in the aftermath of Baton Rouge's tumultuous summer of 2016.From left to right: Manship faculty Dr. Michael Henderson and Dr. Diane Francis discuss the results of the community resilience study they conducted in the aftermath of Baton Rouge's tumultuous summer of 2016.

Michael Henderson, director of the Manship School's Public Policy Research Lab, discusses the results of the community resilience study.Michael Henderson, director of the Manship School's Public Policy Research Lab, presents findings from the community resilience studyAs part of a capstone class experience, Create Lab students presented a social media campaign plan for Dialogue on Race Louisiana (DORLA). DORLA is a nonprofit dedicated to dismantling institutional racism through education and dialogue.As part of a capstone class experience, Create Lab students presented a social media campaign plan for Dialogue on Race Louisiana (DORLA). DORLA is a nonprofit dedicated to dismantling institutional racism through education and dialogue.

From left to right: Panelists Wilborn P. Nobles III, Minjie Li, Dr. Jay Shelledy, panel organizer Dr. Erin Coyle, and panelist Andrea Gallo discuss their experiences with LSU's Cold Case Project, in which Manship students obtain and examine documents in an attempt to re-examine the evidence remaining from unsolved murders of the Civil Rights era.From left to right: Panelists Wilborn P. Nobles III, Minjie Li, and Dr. Jay Shelledy discuss their experiences with LSU's Cold Case Project.From left to right: Panel organizer Dr. Erin Coyle and panelist Andrea Gallo listen as one of the other panelists shares his experience with the Cold Case ProjectFrom left to right: Panelists Minjie Li and Dr. Jay Shelledy react to something shared by a panelist during the Cold Case Project panel.