History | LSU Homecoming

History of LSU Homecoming

2017

  • “Roarin' on the River”
  • Camille Faircloth and Matthew Boudreaux crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. Troy 21-24 L
  • Concert featured Aminé
  • Homecoming Week featured LSU's Fall Fest on Friday

2016

  • “Chance of Reign…Always!”
  • Natalie Burges and Jacques Petit crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. Missouri, 42-7 W
  • Coach Ed Ogeron’s first game as LSU head coach
  • Concert featured The Internet, with student headliners chosen from LSU’s Got Talent
  • Student Homecoming Committee hosts LSU’s Got Talent competition among musicians, spoken word poets, vocalists, dancers, and apparel designers

2015

  • “Let the Good Times ROAR!”
  • Bianca Webb and Michael “Panther” Mayan crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. Western Kentucky, 48-20 W
  • Concert featured Tinashe, with student headliners chosen from Student Activities Board‘s Open Mic Nights. The Student Activities Board hosts the Homecoming concert for the first time.

2014

  • “Louisiana State of Mind”
  • Chi Nguyen and Bradley Williams crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. Ole Miss, 10-7 W
  • 20,148 pounds of food collected through CANapalooza for the Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank
  • Concert featured DJ Rod Youree, Joel Crouse, and headliner Love and Theft
  • Student Homecoming Committee hosts Field Day for the first time, welcoming students for a carnival atmosphere during the day on the Parade Ground

2013

  • “Geauxing Back in Time”
  • Emma Arceneaux and Alex Cagnola crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. Furman, 48-16 W
  • LSU Manship School of Mass Communication celebrates centennial with week of special events during Homecoming. The week’s highlight was Lunch with Carl Bernstein
  • 21,372 pounds of food collected through CANapalooza for the Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank
  • Concert featured Karmin

2012

  • “Showing Your Stripes: Celebrating Traditions and Leaving a Legacy”
  • Kendall Knobloch and R. Taylor Cox crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. Mississippi State, 37-13 W
  • 19,139 pounds of food collected through CANapalooza for the Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank

2011

  • “Home Sweet Home: Calling LSU”
  • Mo Isom and Zachary Corbin crowned queen and king
  • LSU vs. University of Western Kentucky, 42-9 W
  • CANapalooza built “Tiger Stadium” again, with 25,521 lbs. of cans in a 2-day “Blitz Build”
  • Homecoming Veterans Day Salute beginning at 11am on 11/11/11
  • Zydeco band concert; “Spirit Wall” and Splatterbeat returned
  • Parade Grand Marshall Chad Jones

2010

  • LSU’s 150th Anniversary
  • Kristin Davis and Stuart Watkins crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. University of Louisiana at Monroe, 51-0 W
  • CANapalooza collected 23,988 lbs of food (approximately 26,000 cans) and built Tiger Stadium on the Parade Ground on a wooden structure designed by Remson Haley Herpin Architects
  • “LSU Day” celebrated with exhibits and activities across campus
  • giant king cake constructed in the Union Ballroom and distributed on the Parade Ground
  • Spirit Wall returned
  • Competition theme was “Roaring into the Future”

2009

  • “100 Years of Homecoming”
  • Melissa Landry and Jim Rabalais crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. LA Tech, 24-16 W
  • CANapalooza can structure building raised 10,437 lbs of cans for the Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank and featured Splatterbeat and Streamline in concert
  • “Blinky” Tigers became a hot Homecoming giveaway item
  • UREC games, Step Show, banner competition, Homecoming Salutes LSU veterans
  • Tiger fans signed Spirit Wall all week
  • Coach Paul Mainieri was Grand Marshall of the parade

2008

  • “The ’Ship Sails Again”
  • Kristen Oaks and Josh King crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. Troy University, 40-31 W
  • Battle of the Cans (7,208 lbs), 5K, Champions in their Field Career Panel (select LSU alumni), Concert: hip-hop artist Sean Kingston and singer-songwriter Gavin Degraw
  • Each morning there were games, prizes, and a KLSU live remote in the commuter lots

2007

  • “Determined to Dominate”
  • Sydney Brown and David Hartwig crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. LA Tech, 58-10 W
  • 5K, Step Show, Cookoff, and Block Party, 6,521 lbs of cans collected

2006

  • “Where Heroes Are Made”
  • Sarah Ford and Kyle Goldich crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. Tulane, 49-7 W
  • 5K, Carnival, Lip Sync, Cookoff, 8,705 lbs of cans collected

2005

  • “Homecoming Goes Hollywood”
  • Meghan O’Hara and Brad Golson crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. Applachian State, 24-0 W
  • 5K, Comedian: Kathy Griffin
  • Collected 17,399 lbs of cans

2004

  • “It’s Game Time!”
  • Chloé Wiley and Colton Fontenot crowned queen and king.
  • LSU v. Troy University, 24-20 W
  • Student organizations collected more than 30,316 lbs of food for the Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank
  • 5K, Games, Lip Sync, Reno-Round scavenger hunt, video game tournament, Concert: Culture Sol & Grey Street

2003

  • “Rock and Roar”
  • Rachel Sherburne and Steven Scales crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. LA Tech, 49-10 W
  • 5K, Games, Lip Sync, Run-Around, Friday Fright Fest, Battle of the Cans (15,519 lbs), Concert: Better Than Ezra

2002

  • “A Louisiana Tradition”
  • Monique Chaubaud and Mark Higgins crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. ULL, 48-0 W
  • Due to hurricane weather, the Pep Rally and Concert (Gin Blossoms) were canceled, but the Run Around and other events continued as planned. Blood drive, Lip Sync, 5K, Battle of the Cans (12,411 lbs)

2001

  • “Paws and Stripes Forever”
  • Melanie Hebert and Darrel Broussard crowned queen and king.
  • LSU v. Middle Tennessee, 30 -14 W
  • 5K/Fun Run, Blood Drive (donors received a t-shirt and pint of ice cream), Concert: They Might Be Giants

2000

  • “Gold Rush”
  • Stacie Lambert and Jeremy Coco crowned queen and king.
  • LSU v. University of Alabama-Birmingham, 13-10 L
  • 5K and Fun Run, Blood Drive, Concert: Run DMC, Brother Keyle & the Funky Beans

1999

  • “Purple Reign”
  • Kelly Hannaman and Sterling Foster crowned queen and king.
  • LSU v. North Texas, 52-0 W
  • First year to have a Homecoming Concert: Cowboy Mouth
  • Blood drive, Purple and Gold games, Run-a-round
  • Students voted for King and Queen through their PAWS accounts.
  • The bonfire was discontinued due to the death of 12 Texas A&M students in a bonfire accident.

1998

  • “The Year of the Tiger”
  • Victoria Cooper and Matthew Whitworth crowned queen and king.
  • LSU v. Idaho, 53-20 W
  • Pep rally, parade; last year to have a bonfire.

1997

  • “Saturday Night Fever on the Bayou”
  • Jenny Hale and Christopher Popov crowned queen and king.
  • Akron, 56-0 W
  • Pep rally, bonfire, parade

1996

  • “The Party That Wakes the Dead”
  • Olivia Smith and Warren Morris crowned queen and king
  • LSU v. New Mexico State, 63-7 W
  • Homecoming was a success, even though rain canceled the bonfire and parade.

1995

  • “Mike’s Magic, The Best of LSU”
  • Rachel Baughman and Craig Green crowned queen and king
  • Pep rally, bonfire, parade

1994

  • “Bring Back the Gold”
  • Kimberly Walters and David Oliver crowned queen and king.
  • LSU v. South Carolina Gamecocks 17-18 L
  • The annual bonfire was topped with a fake SC Gamecock.

1991

  • “A Frenzy of Festivities”
  • Renée Boutte, our first African American Homecoming Queen, was crowned.
  • This was the last year for the Queen to reign without a King.
  • Highlights included the “Almost Anything Goes” competition, “Know-It-All-Challenge,” and “Most Outrageous Fan” competition.

1990

  • Laurie White was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Ole Miss, 10-19 L

1989

  • Dede Sabagh was crowned queen

1988

  • “Home Games: Where Everyone Plays to Win”
  • Marla Hiburn was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Ole Miss, 31-20 W

1987

  • “20th Century Through the Eyes of Mike the Tiger”
  • Andree Verzwyvelt was crowned queen

1986

  • “Mike Takes a World Tour”
  • Nancy Dugal was crowned queen

1984

  • “Mike’s US Victory Tour”
  • Shari Kerrigan was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Vanderbilt Commodores, 34-27 W
  • Students camped in front of the ticket office to make sure they got their homecoming tickets and date tickets. By 1pm on Monday all 1500 date tickets were sold out. Organizations decorated the campus with portrayals of Mike in different parts of the country.
  • Festivities included a fireworks display over the lakes.

1983

  • Sheila Howarth was crowned queen

1982

  • Elizabeth Bearden was crowned queen
  • LSU v. South Carolina, 14-6 W
  • The week included the “Almost Anything Goes” competition, the LSU Run Around, and a fireworks show. Keeping with the times, pomping included themes such as “Star Wars: Mike Strikes Back.”

1980

  • Elissa Gomez was crowned queen by Governor Dave Treen and accompanied on the field by Alumni Association President Tom Ruffin

1979

  • Sandra Cadriel was crowned queen

1978

  • Lisa Cangelosi was crowned queen

1977

  • Judy Fousch was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Kentucky, 33-7 L

1976

  • Monica James was crowned queen

1975

  • Liz Taylor was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Florida, 34-6 L

1974

  • Gay Williams was crowned queen
  • “The Year of the Tiger”

1973

  • Jean Cotter was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Mississippi State, 26-7 W

1972

  • Janine Robichaux was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Mississippi State, 28-14 W

1971

  • Debbie Evans was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Florida, 48-7 W

1970

  • Tanya Graham was crowned queen 

1969

  • Becky White was crowned queen
  • “A Time for Homecoming”
  • LSU v. Auburn, 21-20 W

1968

  • Paula Norris was crowned queen
  • LSU v. TCU, 10-7 W

1967

  • Judy Lowe was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Kentucky

1966

  • Jane Honic was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Florida, 28-7 L
  • During this period the Queen was selected by a different process. Each organization would nominate someone, then the football team would decide who made the court. Finally, the campus would vote for the Queen, who was revealed at Tiger Tantrums on Friday Night.

1965

  • June Russel was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Kentucky, 31-21 W
  • As in many previous years, the Queen was crowned on the traditional Tiger Rug.

1964

  • Von Sandifer was crowned queen
  • Tennessee 3-3 1963
  • Janie Parks was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Kentucky, 28-7 W

1962

  • Anne Mire was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Florida, 23-0 W
  • LSU beat Florida to a sell out crowd of 67,500. As usual the court was escorted under the Pershing Rifles (the Arc of Steel) and the Queen was crowned on the traditional Tiger Rug.

1961

  • Judy Seeber was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Kentucky, 24-14 W
  • The week included the election, queen’s luncheon, bonfire, fireworks, and student show.

1960

  • Zizi Ogden was crowned queen
  • LSU v. South Carolina, 35-0 W

 

1959

  • Sandra Chudy was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Ole Miss, 7-3 W

1958

  • Mertie Cate Barnes was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Florida, 10-7 W
  • Events included the military parade and a joint pep rally with Florida before the game. According to the Gumbo, “this win made LSU the nation’s finest according to the AP Poll.”

1957

  • Betty Lee Berdon was crowned queen before a crowd of 35,000, escorted by Ken Osterberger, student body president. She came across the field under an arch of sabers formed by members of the Scabbard and Blade.
  • The torchlight parade Friday night included Mascot Mike, the Military Band, cheerleaders, Purple Jackets, Pershing Rifles and students carrying torches.
  • For the first time in many years, there was a Cadet Corps review at 10am on Homecoming Day.
  • LSU v. Tennessee, 22-3 L

1956

  • Barbara Purswell was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Florida, 6-21 L
  • There was a military show on parade grounds, joint pep rally on the Indian Mounds, and the military parade.

1955

  • Linda Fields was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Mississippi State, 18-14 W
  • Linda was the first recent Homecoming Queen to be chosen by the student body. As usual, there was a joint pep rally with Miss State on the Indian Mounds prior to the game.
  • There was also a pre-game variety show.
  • Finally, the event concluded with a Homecoming dance next to the Gym Armory with music by Tommy Crews Orchestra.

1954

  • Elizabeth Ann “Libby” Colvin was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Ole Miss, 21-5 L

1953

  • LSU v. Mississippi State, 26-13 L

1952

  • Fran Farrell was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Tennessee, 3-22 L

1951

  • LSU v. Ole Miss, 6-6
  • Before a crowd if 40,000, it was the first time the Tigers had ever tied with the Rebels. Themes such as, “We’re Tugging Down Ole Miss” were among the floats in the parade.

1950

  • Mary Morris was crowned queen

1949

  • Roslyn Sussman reigns as queen, with 17 maids.
  • The best decorated buildings on campus were awarded trophy cups by the Alumni Association in the pre-game ceremony.
  • LSU v. Miss State, 34-7 W

1948

  • “Ole War Skule”
  • Mary Sue Smith was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Ole Miss, 49-7 L
  • To honor alumni, the band played “Campus Memories” during half time. After the game, to honor returning alumni and Ole Miss visitors a post game dance was held in the Gym-Armory.

1947

LSU v. Vanderbilt, 19-13 W

1946

  • “Victory Homecoming”
  • Ann Jackson was crowned queen
  • Tech Jackets
  • It was the first official Homecoming since 1942. The weekend was a perfect place for reunion with a parade, pep meeting, handshaking, and a bonfire.

1942

  • LSU’s only wartime Homecoming
  • Bonfire, dance and parade

1941

  • Deanie was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Tennessee, 13-6 L
  • The first annual Tiger Parade was held, with 52 campus organizations.

1940

  • LSU v. Vanderbilt, 7-0 W
  • Colleges of the University initiated the practice of entertaining their own grads.

1939

  • Dot Pecot was crowned queen
  • LSU v. Tennessee, 20-0 L
  • The Queen presented Alumni President Tom Dutton with the scepter for “Alumni Rule for the Day.” The weekend consisted of a bonfire on Friday night, luncheons, open houses, and the Homecoming Dance on Saturday night.

1938

LSU v. Vanderbilt, 7-0 W

1937

  • Jane Gibson was crowned Beauty Queen
  • A 208-piece Tiger Band, the largest in history, performed.

1935

Helene King was chosen queen by Student Body President/Cadet Colonel/football star Abe Mickal.

1933

  • Marguerite Bass was chosen first Homecoming queen by the student body president, and reigned with a princess and seven maids. She rode onto the field before kickoff in a convertible—”very flashy at that time,” she said later.
  • Marching cadets were part of the halftime show.
    The famous ‘08 Tiger eleven, who had won the Southern championship without defeat, were honored.
  • The “Purple Jackets” made their initial appearance. In white flannel skirts and berets, purple flannel jackets embroidered with a gold “L,” and white scarves, they sat in a reserved section and urged the Tigers to victory.
    LSU v. Vanderbilt, 7-7

1932

Note was taken that for the past 3 Homecomings, the Tigers met their traditional rival, the mountain Tigers of the South, Sewanee.

1930

Dr. Charles E. Coates, organizer and coach of the first Tiger team in 1893, was recognized. He presented monograms to former Tiger gridmen who had graduated before LSU started presenting awards.

1931

At the pep meeting, Gov. Huey P. Long described his ideas on how cheerleading should be done.

1929

“Swamp S’wanee”

Freshmen women wore white dresses and green caps “for effect,” and students and alumni joined in a snake-dance at halftime.

1928

A Friday pep meeting included a snake dance down Third Street by pajama-clad cadets. Ole Miss W 1927 No celebration

1926

The Tigers won their first Homecoming game against Ole Miss.

1925

  • First “official” Homecoming Oct. 10
  • Alumni had the opportunity to visit the new University, which had just moved to its present location.
  • Festivities included a pep meeting, night-shirt parade, and band concert.
  • Alumni had a special section reserved for them at the game LSU’s first mascot, a black bobtailed tiger named “Little-Eat-’Em-Up,” a gift the previous year from an alumnus in South America, relaxed on the sidelines.
  • LSU v. Alabama, 42-0 L

1922

  • E. L. Stephans, president of the Alumni Association, proposed that one game be attended by the alumni in a body to boost Tiger morale.
  • Grads turned out by the thousands for the 20th meeting with the Green Wave.
  • Called “first Homecoming celebration” by the Reveille
  • LSU v. Tulane, 25-14 W

1914

A “general reunion of the LSU family,” reported the Reveille, although the game was at Tulane.

1910

First recorded gathering of LSU alumni, on the 50th anniversary of the founding of LSU. (It is possible that a meeting of this type was held on the 25th anniversary, but there is no record of it.)

1909

In 1949, a Reveille article titled “Files Show First Homecoming Took Place December, 1909,” reported that a Reveille article from December 1909 stated that “The anniversary [in 1910] will also provide a great Homecoming, the gathering together of men who have made the University and have been made by it.” The anniversary in 1910 was to be the the 50th anniversary of LSU. On the basis of the misleading headline, the 2009 Homecoming theme was “100 Years of Homecoming.” (The first “official” Homecoming was in 1925.)